butcherbirds

juvenile grey butcherbird

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This is a very healthy young Grey Butcherbird, a common bird through out most of Australia. When adult the brown feathers will be replaced by black and the the washed olive chest feathers by white ones. This bird was devouring a dragonfly with gusto, smashing it onto the top of a broken branch, impaling its victims being one of its tricks. I spotted it amoung the gnarled banksia and tea trees that grown along the top of North Head, Manly, one of the promontories that mark the entrance to Sydney Harbour. Its such a spectacular spot with the views of the harbour and the city skyline in the distance, that I always head there on my visits down south to see family.

PS. Hello to my old WordPress friends /followers. I miss participating in this forum on a daily basis but alas I have been plagued with technical difficulties with WordPress over the last several months …driving me away in frustration. As these difficulties only happen on WordPress I think it may be a mix of the constant changes WordPress favours and changes with my internet server. I hope to overcome these problems eventually but in the meantime thanks for still following me and keep those posts coming :D.

 

 

baby grey butcherbird

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Grey Butcherbirds are common throughout most of Australia. They end up around the 30cm mark head to tail but make up for their size with a fierce courage when it comes to hunting. They will capture and wedge large prey such as lizards, mice and insects …even small birds… into the fork of a tree to aid in tearing it to small pieces. They are not adverse to a little impaling of prey when it suits them. However they have such beautiful songs and are friendly to humans… such as this little one that regularly visits the birdbath outside my bedroom window.

adult pied butcherbird

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By adulthood the Pied Butcherbird has changed its brown feathers for black. The young often stay for some time with the adults, even helping build the next needed nest before embarking on their own journey. This adult was in the company of the juvenile in the previous post.